News

Motive for the Death of Nia Wilson By White Male Supremacist Still Unknown

posted by J.J. Riley 0 comments

Nia Wilson
Sunday July 22, Nia Wilson (18) and her 26-year-old sister Lahtifa Wilson were attacked on the BART platform. According to reports the attack was completely unprovoked. Nia Wilson died from her wounds.

The murder of Nia led to a 1,000 person march as a vigil for the slain teen. The police are still unclear as to why John Cowell, 27, which was arrested Monday in connection to the stabbing of the teen and her sister. While family members and general public believe that it was racially motivated and should be deemed a hate crime.

Nia described as beautiful inside and out and would give the shirt off her back was a recent graduate of Oakland High School. Nia had aspirations of being in the music business.

The Suspect family released a statement saying “He has been in & out of jail & has not had the proper treatment,” the statement said. He’s been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, the family said, and they had to get a restraining order at one point “for our own protection.” Cowell’s been living on the streets since.

While most feel this is a cope out and justice for Nia and her Sister should be served. While there seems to be divided on whether it is racially motivated or not, the truth of the matter is a beautiful black girls’ life was cut short by the hands of a white man and it is not okay. We should feel safe without the threat of senseless and unprovoked violence. Our family members shouldn’t have to worry every time we step outside our homes that we will not return.

Anne Hathaway made a power statement in regards to this heartbreaking case. In this statement she attacks white privilege.

Hathaway wrote on Instagram: “[Wilson’s death] is unspeakable and must not be met with silence … She was a black woman and she was murdered in cold blood by a white man.

“White people – including me, including you – must take into the marrow of our privileged bones the truth that all black people fear for their lives daily in America and have done so for generations.

“We must ask our (white) selves – how ‘decent’ are we really? Not in our intent, but in our actions? In our lack of action?”
Let’s not let her death or the death of many other’s go in vain.

You may also like

Leave a Comment